Porth's Pathophysiology Test Bank - 9th Edition - by Sheila

Succeed in your pathophysiology text with this 9th edition of Porth&;s Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States. Captivating and easy-to understand, this proven book provides comprehensive, nursing-focused coverage designed to help you grasp both the physical and psychological aspects of altered health.

  • Master the most clinically relevant and difficult to understand disorderswith advanced 3D narrated animations.
  • Prepare for clinical practice with 14 unit-opening case studies
  • that put a real face on pathophysiology and help you relate the clinical presentation to the underlying pathophysiology.
  • Master the information you need for success in your career with the unparalleled coverage of disease processes that make this text the most comprehensive pathophysiology text available.
  • Increase your understanding of key concepts with the full-color art program that illustrates the clinical manifestations of diseases and disease processes.
  • Find the information you need fast with the book&;s consistent presentation of each disease , with detailed coverage of pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and evaluation and treatment.
  • Reinforce your understanding of key content with chapter-ending review exercises .
  • Develop a strong understanding of pathophysiology concepts with the easy-to-follow narrative that builds concepts on one another, defines words as content is presented, and reviews concepts from physiology, biochemistry, physics, and other sciences along the way.
  • Deepen your understanding by pausing and reviewing salient points using the easily-identified section-opening Objectives and section-ending Summaries.
  • Retain and apply text information using Key Concepts Boxes
  • help you incorporate key information into a larger conceptual unit, rather than memorizing a string of related and unrelated facts.
  • Easily access useful references including lists of common suffixes and prefixes, normal laboratory values in both conventional and SI units, and a comprehensive glossary.
  • Take your understanding beyond the book with anytime, anywhere access to the fully searchable eBook online.



What resources are included in this purchase?


  • Test Bank - Word Files
  • Answers to Case Studies
  • Answers to Assignments
  • Answers to Pre-Lecture Quiz
  • Instructor Resources

Sample of the Test Bank

1.

During a discussion on cellular components and their function, a student asked the instructor the purpose of messenger RNA (mRNA). Of the following, which is the most accurate answer?

 

A)

Transports amino acids to the site of protein synthesis

 

B)

Acts as an inner nuclear support membrane for a rigid network of protein filaments that bind DNA to the nucleus

 

C)

Performs an active role of protein synthesis, where mRNA molecules direct the assembly of proteins on ribosomes to the cytoplasm

 

D)

Assists cells in forming neoplastic progression by altering the response of chromatin in the nuclear matrix

 

Ans:

C

 

Feedback:

 

The nucleus is the site for the synthesis of three types of RNA that move to the cytoplasm and carry out the actual synthesis of proteins. Messenger RNA copies and carries the DNA instructions for protein synthesis to the cytoplasm. Ribosomal RNA is the site of actual protein synthesis; transfer RNA transports amino acids to the site of protein synthesis.

 

 

2.

The nurse is providing care for a client with a diagnosis of cirrhosis, and she notes that the client's sclerae are jaundiced. The nurse recalls that jaundice is a pigment that can accumulate in which part of the cell?

 

A)

Nucleus

 

B)

Cytoplasm

 

C)

Golgi apparatus

 

D)

Rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER)

 

Ans:

B

 

Feedback:

 

Pigments such as bilirubin and melanin can accumulate in the cytoplasm, resulting in the characteristic yellow skin tones associated with jaundice. Pigments do not tend to accumulate in the nucleus, Golgi apparatus, or rough ER.

 

 

3.

A 14-year-old female has been experiencing severe internal cramps in the region of the pelvis and weight loss.She has been admitted with rectal bleeding.The physician has diagnosed her with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). She asks the nurse what causes this disease. The nurse will base her response knowing that IBD has been linked to

 

A)

liver involvement in faulty glycogen stores.

 

B)

endoplasmic reticulum stress in the gastrointestinal system.

 

C)

oversecretion of insulin from the beta cells in the pancreas.

 

D)

infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by bacterial toxins.

 

Ans:

B

 

Feedback:

 

Researchers are determining links between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and various disease processes. For examples, ER stress in the GI system has been found to be related to intestinal inflammations such as those occur with inflammatory bowel disease. The smooth ER of the liver is involved in glycogen stores. Insulin is synthesized as a large, inactive proinsulin molecule cut apart to produce a smaller, active insulin molecule within the Golgi complex of the beta cells. Bacterial toxins have exploited the retrograde transport mechanism.

 

 

4.

A professor is teaching a group of students about the role of mitochondria within the cell. Which of the following statements is true of mitochondria?

 

A)

They are the site of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production.

 

B)

The number of mitochondria in a cell is equal to the number of nuclei.

 

C)

They are replicated within the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER).

 

D)

Mitochondrial DNA is inherited patrilineally.

 

Ans:

A

 

Feedback:

 

Consistent with their characterization as the “power plants” of the cell, mitochondria are the site of ATP synthesis for the cell. The number of mitochondria in a given cell type varies, according to the energy demands of the particular cell. They are self-replicating rather than being produced in the smooth ER, and they are inherited matrilineally.

 

 

5.

A patient has been diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease called multiple sclerosis (MS). The physician explains to the patient that this disease may be caused by dysregulated apoptosis. Later that day, the patient asks the nurse what this means. The nurse should reply,

 

A)

“The cells around your nerves don't know how to die correctly.”

 

B)

“The cytoplasm should neutralize the various apoptotic inhibitors but isn't working correctly.”

 

C)

“Dysregulated apoptosis has caused an excessive rate of programmed cell death along the neuropathways.”

 

D)

“There is an inappropriately low rate of apoptosis occurring within the cells.”

 

Ans:

C

 

Feedback:

 

Dysregulated apoptosis can mean too little or too much and has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, in which there is an increased or excessive rate of apoptosis.

 

 

6.

A patient experiencing immotile cilia syndrome should be frequently assessed by the nurse for which priority complication?

 

A)

Porth's Pathophysiology Test Bank - 9th Edition - by Sheila

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